India

Gie Goris (CC BY-NC 2.0)
Analysis

Modi’s new education policy: a next step in the saffronisation of India?

End of July, the Modi government approved a lengthy proposal to reform education policy and structures in India. This New Education Policy is presented as the stepping stone to bring india in the right position to be a main player in tomorrow’s knowledge economy. Critics fear it is rather turning India towards an imagined past of Hindu glory, under ...
Report

Under the Silence and the Scars: a Kashmir that Will Not Forget or Forgive

Three months after BJP-led government of India stripped Jammu and Kashmir from its special status, the silence from the Valley is deafening, and cracking. Khalid Hussein reports for MO* from the worst hit villages in Kashmir about the cries and the whispers, the gathering storm, the wounds that will not heal.
Analysis

It is not all about Narendra Modi. And that might not be a good thing.

It took the nation six week to get voting boots into less than 2 km from every one of the 900 million people who were eligible to vote. In the end about 600 million did vote, and on May 23th, the verdict was released.  Hindu-nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party (BJP) was able to win 303 seats of 543 in the Lokh Sabha, an increase of 21 seats ove ...
(c) Pradeep Shukla
Analysis

Switzerland by the sea

According to the UN Conference for Trade and Development (UNCTAD), Switzerland ranks 20th in the world in terms of the number of ships owned, but 15th in terms of the number of ships scrapped on beaches. “The percentage of Swiss ships that ended up on the beach is almost 100%. That puts Switzerland in the top 10 of global dumpers,” said ...
(c) Amit Dave
Report

Mendeleev beaches: shipbreaking and the spilling of copper, cobalt, manganese, lead, cadmium, nickel, zinc and mercury

The Science for Environment Policy (European Commission) provided an overview of several studies, one of which clearly showed just how heavily the Alang-Sosiya natural environment has been polluted by copper, cobalt, manganese, lead, cadmium, nickel, zinc and mercury. Warning: reading this can damage your profit margins.
(c) Pradeep Shukla
Interview

Baskut Tuncak: “As long as the world allows shipping companies to choose the rules they want to abide by, regulation is all but impossible”

Baskut Tuncak is, UN Special Rapporteur on hazardous substances and wastes: “In shipbreaking yards, workers often are exposed to toxic chemicals including asbestos, dusts and fibres, highly toxic industrial chemicals which have been banned for decades but are still present in ships, as well as lead, mercury, arsenic or cadmium in paints, coat ...
(c) Amit Dave
Report

Why beaching is so hard for companies to resist

The road to Alang is lined with shops and warehouses selling items that once used to sail across the world’s oceans. Oak desks, faux crystal chandeliers, life vests and boats, ropes, electric cables and switches, leather chairs, paintings and reproductions, giant generators and motors – you name it. It is ship recycling in its most lite ...
The Oriental N (a vessel that became notorious under the original name Exxon Valdez) ended up on one of the beach yards of Alang, India
Report

 “Every day on the shipbreaking yard can be your last”

“Shipbreaking has grown into a major occupational and environmental health problem in the world. It is amongst the most dangerous of occupations, with unacceptably high levels of fatalities, injuries and work-related diseases”, the International Labour Organisation (ILO) warned in 2015. Dr Geetanjoy says that data from the Gujarat ...
© arjun Sharma
Analysis

Artificial glaciers for a Himalayan desert: solution or hype?

From disappearing caps in Greenland to receding glaciers on Mount Everest, ice is the most visible symbol in the debate over climate change. In the high-altitude Himalayan region of Ladakh - located in the volatile Indian state of Jammu & Kashmir - ice is more than a rhetorical concern.
© Gie Goris
Analysis

More People Displaced By Development Than By Natural Disasters

People run from war, persecution, disaster and a hopeless future. But every year, around 15 million people are also forced to leave behind their homes, land and communities because they need to make way for large dams, mines, or other large-scale projects of economic development.
(c) Brecht Goris
Interview

Amartya Sen on elections, communal politics and inequality in India

There is no lack of famous Indians, but few of the more than 1.2 billion Indians will come close to the global renown and respect of Amartya Sen, Nobelprize for Economy in 1998 and author of numerous books on economy, development, identity and justice. Sen has been living and working in the West for decades, but he is looking forward to being part ...
Gie Goris
Essay

Five rules to successfully debate India

Europalia India will flood Brussels and vicinity with arts from India, from October to February. MO* provides a survival guide to navigate the endless receptions and discussions accompanying all those exhibitions, cultural shows, performances and encounters that arrive from the country that Amartya Sen and Jean Drèze describe as ‘islands of C ...

Pages